Thursday, January 26, 2017

Building Love - 2017

Growing Trust

Trust is the operative word for a Building Love. . The operative skill is how to build trust when distrust is induced? Oppression induces us to distrust ourselves and each other. It’s like learning to grow food in a torrential rain. Conventional growing wisdom is not enough. However, the skill of AYA’s 2017 Black Love Building Honorees is more than sufficient. The honorees are:

Brother Wade and Sister Monica Muhammad

Brother Wade and Sister Monica Muhammad have cut a new path through a thicket of obstacles. They have been growing their love in this torrent of oppression for nearly 28 years. This year, they will celebrate their 25th anniversary and they will celebrate their children: 5 girls, 2 boys and their “bonus” sons and daughters:

  • Ayanna and bonus son - Jeff 
  • Aisha and bonus son - George 
  • Amiynah and our bonus son - Jamar
  • Horace
  • Emmanuel
  • Zuheerah 
  • Tynnetta

For them, nation-building is family building. It is at the center of their building with and for our people. They are also proud of the grands which they call Generation X. With the latest grand on the way, Wade and Monica have figured out how to grow family cohesiveness in a torrential rain. They are so smoooooth at it, though!


Modesty rules. Brother Wade is probably shaking his head at the attention garnered by this short introduction. He and Monica give credit to the presence of Allah - God in their hearts and their lives.  However, it would be an error to take their modesty for weakness or timidity.

They are quiet a powerhouse in our community – touching lives, teaching, organizing and leading by example. Guided by the  “do for self” philosophy together they continue to procure land and create a sustainable family agricultural business.

When pressed for the keys to their success, the answer from their lips is the same. “The success we have experienced on our journey thus far is the Synchronicity of our Belief in putting Allah God at the forefront of everything.”

The consistency of their actions, their unselfishly sharing themselves with the community, and risking to make “do for self” a reality, tell the same story in a more observable way.

Across generations in the family and across various groups in the Black community, they’ve learned to engender trust over distrust. They have learned how to grow food in a torrential rain.

Join us. Their love has something for us. In turn, they need us to help hold back the rain – so they can grow some more food for our community.


See you on Feb. 11th @ 7pm.