Friday, June 19, 2015

The "Trans-racial" President? No, not Rachel Doleza, The Other One.

America doesn't have to deal with its "racist" and violent past, just its violent past, right? Somehow, if guns are controlled, then racism will also be controlled, right?  The POTUS doesn't see color very well, so he can't help us. On the rare occasions when he does, he chastises the Congressional Black Caucus, the Morehouse Men. He demands that the  Black "thugs" in Baltimore be stopped, and sends drones to his father's Kenya.

When he opens his mouth his White grandfather speaks. When he observes, his White mother and white grandmother sees. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe he's just taking care of us, so he doesn't incite a riot. White vigilante massacres and state-funded genocide from education to police brutality are ok, just not ANY form of Black resistance.

His White grand mother would be terrified of Black resistance, since he reports that she was chaffed at Black existence. His loving White grandfather would come to her aid, though he'd know her pathology. The grandfather would exhibit a kindler gentler form of the same pathology - racism.

The POTUS's  Black father was an abstraction. Young Barrack  didn't hear the stories of the Kenyan Mau Mau loving Afrikan life and being so dedicated to freedom from British domination, that the rule was  -"if shot or injured in battle, and if you could only get your teeth on them, you were to "naw them to death."

So, three white people sent him out to live in a world that would know him as Black. I'm not unsympathetic to the daunting personal challenge of loving people who see your father and part of you as unworthy. Just as he made allowances and cared for those racist white people who loved him at the expense of his Blackness (that was an abstraction), he's making allowances for white America at the expense of Afrikan people today. Just as child would want to reconcile fighting parents with a "why can we all just get along" look, he's asking that Afrikans and Europeans just "get along." It's a beautiful wish, and a child's delusion denying past histories and current realities.

While I can understand what may be his internal "trans-racial" struggle, wittingly or not, he is leading us to the killing fields.

For our part, we are so affirmed by his swag, his "intelligence," his Michelle, and his achieving a position of honor and White acceptance, that we have been willing to walk or even skip to those killing fields. Hundreds of years of oppression has made delusion a survival mechanism to make our surrender unconscious and our death only a matter of time.

Barrack being elected by White people as POTUS was the illusion that invited delusion to the dance, so that we'd voluntarily run to the killing fields -pushing our children ahead of us just in case we faltered on the way.

We've seen it before. Poor parishioners living vicariously off of the fumes of their pastors' 65 million dollar jets.  We shake our heads, and want to shake them to wake them up!

 I want us to wake up.

I want us to stop living vicariously off of the title - POTUS as if that has put more food in our cupboard, recouped our wealth losses,  or stopped our children from being killed by white racist violence?

Black Man or Barrack Surrender?

How can you ask Black men to stand up - risking lives and livelihoods - to fight this racism, and still laud - or should I say "lawd" - this man as an example of Black manhood that you'd want your sons to emulate and daughters to seek? If you must still support him, at least send the Mau Mau call to the little Black boy inside so that Black isn't just an abstraction.

I am sad that it's no longer a "scandal," for Black men to let them "get away with murder" when it us.

Rise in Power - Those murdered in SC.
Will it be the battle field or will we allow the POTUS' internal bi-racial, "trans-racial" struggle and our need for white approval continue to lead us to the Killing field?


Wekesa O. Madzimoyo is the director of and writes for  AYA Educational Institute. www.ayaed.com. AYA researches areas of communication, conflict resolution, and the dynamics of oppression. It develops programs to implement its findings, and provides consultation and training to those wanting to address these issues.